Jun
28
2010
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The Karma Cup: Earn Some at a Starbucks near you

This spring, Starbucks opened up a design competition to its fans for reusable cups called the Betacup Competition, with the goal of going totally green by the year 2015. The winner? Karma Cup. Er, not a cup really, but more of an idea. It’s simple: you bring your own reusable mug to Starbucks and there is a chalkboard at the cash register with rows of 10 spaces, each with a freebie at the end. You mark an ‘x’ on the board, and if you’re the tenth person to purchase your coffee using your own reusable vessel, you get yours free; the idea behind the communal challenge, if you will, being that it encourages everyone to bring their own mugs, because your free cup depends on it, and that guy’s, too. Hence the name Karma Cup. You bring your own cup and earn karma while doing so.

Sounds simple enough to me–now let’s see how it works. Seems like it’d be easier to implement if Starbucks weren’t a huge global chain with a firmly established set of expectations and a certain consistency at least partially to thank for its massive expansion over the last forty years: Tall, Grande, Venti ring a bell, anyone? And  you might lose the comfort of such consistency once Starbucks opens up the playing field to all kinds of uniquely shaped (and sized, for that matter) mugs to embrace its warm (and cold) drinks.

Although Starbucks hasn’t announced when they’re going to start counting customers’ coffee karma, they found this solution particularly appealing because  “It’s a low-risk program that doesn’t require creating any new products, and Starbucks also didn’t want to change the coffee-drinking experience.” (Taken from Fast Company)

For more information about Karma Cup and other honorees, click here.

(image: Fast Company)

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Written by soloflight in: A New Eye |
Jun
17
2010
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Marketing Perspectives: Selecting an Agency: Top Qualities

As an agency that believes in putting our clients first and coming up with creative solutions that fit their needs, we are constantly looking for feedback to understand how to better serve our clients.

Research seems to have shown that clients are looking for specific characteristics within an agency including flexibility, working within tighter budgets, experience, understanding of their company and proven results. While we agree that these are all very important points that we strive for every day, we wanted to ask you for your thoughts. What do you     think should be added to the list of qualities you expect in an agency? Do you agree with the qualities I’ve stated or would you put more emphasis on different ones?

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Written by soloflight in: Marketing Perspective | Tags: , , ,
Jun
17
2010
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Search Engine Pro Tips

I like to think of myself as a Google pro. I think that I can find anything if it can be found on the Web. Yet, after reading an article in January’s issue of Real Simple, I was surprised by the search engine tips that can make you even more of a pro.


For example, I never knew that using quotes around your phase can help or that putting a minus sign in front of a word will narrow your search. This really brought home to me the idea that when doing search engine optimization these types of search tricks can help put you on a client’s radar. So try out some new ways to search for your company’s information and see what you can find.

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Written by soloflight in: Marketing Perspective | Tags: , ,
Jun
17
2010
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Custom Content: Blurring Ads with Editorial: What it might mean for you?

Due to the current economic situation there has been a great deal of discussion related to the blurring between advertiser sections and pure editorial sections within magazines.

While the discussion has mostly focused on what this might mean for the state of credible journalism, those placing ads within these magazines should take the impact on advertisers into account.

If an advertiser places an ad within a special advertising section, readers seem to half-dismiss this content. Yet, you as an advertiser are paying good money for this placement. An alternative to putting your money into this type of advertising would be to turn that customized content related to your business and create your own publication for clients and perspective clients. To be successful though, you must give the reader something more than just a marketing brochure, you have to give them a reason to go back to that publication. Remember your clients are thinking about themselves, not you so add value for them, and they will thank you.

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Written by soloflight in: Marketing Perspective |
Jun
17
2010
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Marketing Perspective: Green Value

Going Eco. Emphasizing Green. Conserving Resources. However you define it, sustainability has become a buzzword for companies across the globe. Yet, how much value do these corporate sustainability programs really have? That is just the question that Heather Clancy addressed in her article “McKinsey tackles value of corporate sustainability programs.”

Analyzing The McKinsey Quarterly’s research related to corporate sustainability programs, Clancy noticed the trend that corporate sustainability programs seem to add more value when these programs meld closely with a company’s core values or ideology.

Customers understand continuity. Customers like to know that you are living up to the values that you preach. If those values include a real care for the earth’s resources, then a great way to show them that you are doing this is through promotion of a sustainability program.

This philosophy can be applied to other programs that companies launch not just sustainability programs. Soloflight’s work with L-3 Communications on their redesigned code of ethics put a new emphasis on corporate behavior. Soloflight refined the code of ethics to convey the ideas of momentum and connect that are fundamental to the core beliefs of L-3. To illustrate this, we employed bold graphics and used a line motif that was inspired by global connectivity. The redesigned code of ethics was so successful in informing and motivating new employees. L-3 believed in their code of ethics to the degree that they wanted all employees to have easy access these values by creating versions in 13 different languages.


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Written by soloflight in: Marketing Perspective | Tags: , , ,
Jun
17
2010
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Please allow me to introduce myself.

My name is Brooke Reid, and I will be interning here at Soloflight for the next two months or so.  Along with others’ Soloflight posts, I’ll be adding my own thoughts, images, articles, etc. to the mix–things I feel to be particularly inspiring or unique to give you further insight into the work we do here at Soloflight among other interesting finds worth sharing from an intern’s perspective.  From the heady to the simple, from the next big thing to that thing that’s been re-blogged more times than I can count, I’ll be providing bits about design, advertising, all other things creative and in my opinion worth showing: you name it, I’ll blog about it.

Take this for example:

What’s Out There: Cool ad work involving the World Cup, or all things sports

http://www.guardian.co.uk/football/world-cup-match-replay

(via Creativity Online)

Check out this high-speed replay of any game of your choosing (US vs. England is a particularly fun one) through what was posted on Twitter in real time from start to finish, goals, halftimes and all.

http://creativity-online.com/work/uniqlo-sportweet/20419

(also via Creativity online)

This interactive viral campaign integrates your Tweets to the beat of athletes’ movements as a way of promoting the Japanese design/clothing/concept powerhouse Uniqlo’s new line of sportswear.  For those of you unfamiliar with Uniqlo, it’s an international brand with its global flagship store in SoHo, known equally for the design of its stores and its high-tech clothing (read: shirts that react to your body heat to keep you cool and crazy things like that).  Its price point like a higher-end H&M, the Japanese clothing brand certainly offers items ranging from your typical T-shirts to those more expensive lines bearing the names of various designer collaborations, but you’re going to have to pay extra for the clothes with superpowers. As for the spot, I’d say it’s worth taking a look at–think Apple ipod commercial meets that crazy little thing called Twitter.


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Written by soloflight in: A New Eye |

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